Dog

Are Rottweilers Good With Cats?

Do Rottweilers Get Along with Cats

You own a cat, but you love dogs. You’re contemplating bringing home a Rottweiler, but you’re not just ready to let go of your cat. Now, the question is: Are Rottweilers good with cats?

If you’re up to date with popular myths, you’ll opine that dogs and cats never get along.

But you’ve watched a dog interact nicely with a cat in a movie. Now, you’re hoping to replicate that with your cat and a Rottweiler.

In this article, you’ll learn if keeping a Rottweiler and a dog is a good idea at all and how you should go about it if that’s acceptable.

Are you excited?

 

Do Rottweilers Get Along With Cats?

 

Believe me, this is not the kind of question you get in an examination with True/False as options. It’s much more than just black and white.

No two Rottweilers are the same, and no two cats are the same. The possibility of successfully introducing your dog to your cat depends on both animals.

If you have a calm Rottie and an aggressive cat, you’ll have some difficulties with the process. Likewise, if you have a peaceful cat and an aggressive Rottweiler, you’ll have a bit of trouble.

However, if you need a specific answer to the question, here is one. Rottweilers do get along with cats, but it depends on the Rottweiler, the cat, and mostly the person in charge of integrating both animals.

 

are rottweilers good with cats

 

If you don’t follow due process while integrating the animals, you’ll likely end up with two foes. If you can do the job perfectly, however, you’ll convince your neighbor to get a Rottie and a cat too!

Don’t take my words for it; search for “Rottweiler and cat” on YouTube and see the videos. Then come back here to learn how to create such a loving relationship between your Rottweiler and your cat.

 

Why Your Rottweiler Might Not Get Along With Cats

 

Before introducing a Rottie to a home with cats, you should examine the odds of both animals getting along.

To be honest, dogs are cats aren’t best of friends. According to Vetstreet, your Rottweiler will form a good relationship with your cat only half of the time. That leaves a 50% possibility of them not getting along!

Also, you’ll hardly find Rottweiler in any list of dogs that are compatible with cats for one reason; Rottweiler is pretty bad with cats!

If you take a look at the statistics above, you’ll notice that a Rottweiler and a cat aren’t a promising pair. There are lots of reasons why this is the case, but we’ll only list the most important.

If your cat and your Rottie clash so often, here are some of the reasons why that happens.

 

are rottweilers good with cats

  1. The Pets’ personalities

No two dogs are the same and this rule applies to cats too. Your Rottweiler might be calm and reserved, and your cat, the exact opposite.

If either of these pets doesn’t approve of the presence of the other, you’ll have to contend with two angry housemates.

You can get an idea of how well the relationship will go by looking up some information about the cat’s breed on Google. If you have a Siamese cat or a Bombay, you should consider looking away from that Rottweiler.

This isn’t suggesting that these cats can’t coexist with dogs. However, if you want the partnership to work, you’ll do more work than you envisaged, which might not be well worth it.

 

  1. They’re Not Socialized.

Cats are typically faster than dogs, and they scratch and bite. A Rottweiler is large and can grow quite aggressive when provoked.

If you don’t train both animals to tolerate the presence of each other, you’ll end up with two always-scuffling pets.

Before leaving your cat alone with a Rottie (like you probably saw on YouTube), you need to ensure that the cats feel safe around the dog and vice versa.

You can introduce the pets to themselves over an obstacle. This will let them sniff each other through the barrier without the chance for a physical scuffle. You should also introduce the dog to the cat on a leash; trust me, you don’t want to see them fight.

 

  1. You’re Not Doing It Well

While you shouldn’t expect every Rottweiler-kitten relationship to work, you’ll be surprised that you may be the culprit.

Integrating an unwelcoming dog like a Rottweiler and a cat is an arduous task. You must be willing to put in the required efforts consistently. Add this with the fact that you must train your Rottweiler yourself, and you’ll have an idea of what you are getting yourself into.

Even if you are willing to put in the effort, is your dog and your cat willing?

Sometimes, your Rottweiler won’t just budge; remember, the chances are 50/50.

 

How to Make Rottweilers Good With Cats

 

Yes, Rottweilers don’t have a perfect relationship with cats, but they’re not all that bad. Your Rottie can have the perfect relationship with your cat; YouTube is my witness.

If you want this partnership to work however, there are a couple of things you have to put in place. No guesses, as we’ve compiled them all in detail.

 

  1. Get a Young Dog

Do you know what’s more dangerous than keeping a Rottweiler and a cat?

It’s keeping an old Rottweiler and a cat. Cats are typically small, and your cat won’t likely be nearly as tall as your dog.

If you have a puppy, it will shrink the gap between the dog and the cat, making it easier to introduce both animals to themselves.

Also, young Rottweilers are easier to socialize, and they take commands faster. If you start with an improperly socialized adult Rottweiler, you might end up with an aggressive dog that won’t take your orders, let alone relate peacefully with the cat.

So, start small.

 

  1. Socialize The Dog

There can be nothing more destructive than keeping an antisocial Rottweiler with a cat. If you don’t socialize with your dog, it can react pretty aggressively to everyday situations.

You don’t want a dog growling just because your cat is kneading on top of it (like you saw on that YouTube video).

If you need to socialize a Rottweiler for your cat, you should bring the dog around other cats. This will teach the dog that cats aren’t that aggressive. If your cat is actually aggressive, you might have some issues here.

Also, you should occasionally keep your Rottie in the same room with the cat. If you’ll be doing this however, the dog should be on a leash, held firmly by an authoritative member of the family.

You can’t just trust the dog, you know!

Note that it’s easier to socialize with a younger Rottweiler than an older one. If the dog is a couple of years old, you should expect this process to be more demanding and less effective; remember, you have a 50/50 chance.

 

  1. Train the Dog

Rottweiler dogs are naturally authoritative. You shouldn’t expect it to respect you as the pack leader right off the bat.

Before introducing your dog to a cat, you should make sure that you have absolute authority over the dog. This way, you can shout off the dog when it’s going off-limits.

Training a Rottie is much different from training other dogs. If you want control over the dog, you must train the dog yourself. Leaving your Rottie to an expert for training is simply out of the question.

 

How to Introduce Rottweiler To Your Cat

 

Now that you know what makes a Rottweiler aggressive around cats, it’s time to bring in a Rottie, mate.

While this isn’t rocket science, it is certainly not all that easy. For a game that you only have half the probability of winning, you have to go all-in, right?

Here’s the exact procedure that has produced perfect kitten-Rottie relationships over the years.

 

  • Go Slowly

Your dog won’t just get acquainted with your cat; it rarely happens. Everyone goes through the same shitty socialization procedure, and I kid you not, it’s boring.

You’ll have to go through the whole process as carefully as possible. Any mistake could be disastrous, even fatal.

Look for signs of distress and relaxation in the Rottweiler. If the dog is distressed, you’re not at all ready for the next round. However, if your Rottie seems relaxed, everything is safe.

For example, if you had your Rottweiler glance at the cat through a gate, and she reacted aggressively, you should repeat the process.

Don’t give up quickly; your dogs could learn to be friends with a cat if you are patient enough.

 

  • Let The Cat Feel At Home, First

The dog is obviously the most dominant of the two. This disparity puts the cat at a defensive standpoint. Before having the Rottie meet your cat, the cat should already be familiar with its surroundings.

Cats should have hiding spots where they run to when they sense a threat. Observe your cat, and make sure it has established its ‘safe spot.’

When the cat has gotten its safe spot, you can start to unite the Rottie and the cat. Remember, baby Rottweilers work best, but you still have a chance with an adult.

 

  • Consider a Dog Kindergarten.

With a 50/50 success rate, uniting a cat and a Rottweiler is a daunting task. Sometimes, all you need is just a little help.

If you’re enrolling your Rottie in a class, you should know that it is not a substitute for obedience training. The trainers can only help you socialize the dog to make the union easier. Only you, the owner can train the Rottweiler to be obedient.

If you’re busy with have a few dollars to spare, you can try a dog kindergarten; there is nothing to lose!

 

MORE ARTICLES

Are German Shepherds Friendly? How To Know If German Shepherds Are Friendly

Are German Shepherds Good With Babies?

Are Rottweilers Good With Kids?

Are German Shepherds Good With Other Dogs?

Are German Shepherds Good with kids?

 

Conclusion

 

Uniting a Rottweiler and a cat is possible, given that you can afford to ‘thoroughly’ train and socialize the dog.

As for the question: are Rottweiler good with cats?

Well, it all depends on several factors. If your Rottweiler is open to a kitten-dog relationship and your cat is moderately accommodating, you should have a good chance of making your dog cat-friendly.

If it doesn’t work out, know that you’re not doing poorly; you only have a 50% chance of success!

Tags

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button
Close